Customer focused energy transition

Discover more about GCI's battery adoption opportunity.

Many energy networks are having trouble transitioning to meet the pace of demand for solar, battery and EV network integration.  Consumer adoption is happening faster than anticipated by network owners and regulators.

To-date, renewable energy transition approaches have either used a technology and infrastructure-based approach or an economic approach to address this problem. These approaches have not always delivered favourable outcomes, and some have resulted in unexpected negative impacts.

To-date, consumer-focused approaches to the network integration challenge have received little attention.

To successfully address this complex challenge it will require an energy transition strategy that is more consumer-focussed, yet integrated with energy networks and respectful of both new technology, existing infrastructure and real-world economic drivers.

Challenge 1: Emissions Reduction

Governments locally and globally have committed to significant emissions reduction targets by 2030 (generally ranging from 45% – 65% reductions on 2005 levels).

Over the same period, total global electricity consumption is forecast to rise significantly:

  • Developed economies – driven by increased electrification of mobility & heating. 
  • Developing economies – driven by rising ownership of household appliances and consumption of goods and services.

Geographical Example: Qld’s 2030 Target

Queensland’s 2030 target

 

Electrification of mobility and industry is forecast to significantly increase Queensland’s electricity demand by 2030, increasing the total emissions reduction necessary to meet Queensland’s 2030 targets.

A combination of strategies and approaches will be required, for example, leveraging solar + battery opportunities to flatten the current energy consumption ‘duck tail’ and reduce fossil fuel-based electricity generation.

Challenge 2: Energy-supply resilience and cost

Energy supply chain is “democratising” – more control transferring to users through their growing ownership of energy generation and storage assets.

Many energy networks are having trouble transitioning to meet the pace of uptake of solar, battery and EV connecting to the network. Consumer adoption is now happening faster than anticipated by network owners and regulators.

Avoiding energy system failure (caused by the un-orchestrated operation of these new energy assets) without the need to make significant investments in new infrastructure is becoming a pressing need in Australia and globally.

It’s too expensive and redundant to simply build more distribution infrastructure doing so will again drive up the cost to the consumer as it did when we responded this way in the early 2000s during mass and rapid air-conditioner adoption.

Failing to successfully address this will cause short and long-term political, economic, environmental and social pain.

To-date, renewable energy transition approaches have used either a technology & infrastructure approach or an economic approach to address this problem. The outcomes have not delivered the desired success and have generated some undesirable impacts.

To-date, consumer-focused approaches to this challenge have received little focus.

To successfully address this complex challenge requires an integrated consumer, technology / infrastructure and economic approach.

 

Discover more about GCI's battery adoption opportunity

GCI Contact: Alex Blauensteiner

 

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