18 October 2017
Prof. Ove Hoegh-Guldberg Photo: Qld Department of Environment and Heritage Protection
Prof Ove Hoegh-Guldberg says: “We can solve the challenge of climate change and we can preserve a large part of the Reef. But we've got to start today.” Photo: Qld Gov DEHP

As well as being among the first in the world to warn of the dangers climate change poses to the Great Barrier Reef, the Director of UQ’s Global Change Institute says he remains hopeful that enough can be done to save the reef for future generations.

Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg features in a new video created by the Queensland Government to showcase some of the positive initiatives currently under way to ‘preserve the wonder’ of the 2300 km Great Barrier Reef.

“If we take action on climate change we'll still have a reef that functions like a reef and that... that's really important,” Professor Hoegh-Guldberg says.

“Because once this is gone, and it will be if we don't deal with the emissions of CO2, then we will have lost something that can never be brought back.

“The solutions here involve the entire community.

“We can solve the challenge of climate change and we can preserve a large part of the Reef. But we've got to start today.”

As well as suggesting action on climate change, the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection website encourages Queenslanders to consider: reducing fertiliser run-off, reducing sediment run-off, protecting turtles, monitoring water quality, dredging management, and the role that rangers can play in protecting the reef.

The site argues that with ever-increasing threats from climate change, poor water quality and coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish, Queenslanders are stepping up and taking action.

“Farmers, communities, industry sectors, scientists, rangers and governments are using the best available science and working together to improve the health of the Great Barrier Reef,” the site suggests.

For more information visit the Queensland Government DEHP website.

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